Hare and lynx population graph answers

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The snowshoe hare may have up to four litters in a year, which average three to eight young. Males compete for females, and females may breed with several males. A major predator of the snowshoe hare is the Canada lynx. Population Dynamics Student Practice (4.1) Population Characteristics. Spatial Distribution: (Visual/Spatial) Using the three animals below tell me their dispersion pattern and tell why this pattern is beneficial specifically for this organism. Then draw this organism in the pattern that you told me it follows in nature. Feb 26, 2015 · This paper-and-pencil activity helps students learn about predator-prey population fluctuations. Be sure to subscribe and check out more videos! ... Lynx and the Hare Population Activity ... Student graphs and method descriptions will vary. Look for trends, such as a steady increase in the hare population, followed by an increase in the lynx population about two years later. As the hare population declines, the lynx population should also decline after a similar lag. 9. Graph the relationship between population size and number of generations for a species like a bacterium that grows exponentially but with none overlapping generations. In your plot (graph) be sure to label each axis, and show clearly how many cells exist at the end of each generation over 4 generations of growth. 10. Play this game to review Biology. What happened to the Hare population after the decrease in Lynx population in 1860? Preview this quiz on Quizizz. What happened to the Hare population after the decrease in Lynx population in 1860? which soon leads to a decrease in the lynx population as well. This decrease in lynx population size, as predicted, leads to an increase in the size of the hare population, which quickly leads to an increase in the size of the lynx population. It is important to note that the hare-lynx graph is less smooth than the generic predator prey graph ... Lynx-Hare Cycles Look at the graph. It illustrates the relationship between the size of the hare population and the size of the lynx population. Notice how each population has a boom (when there are too many lynxes or hares for the available resources) and a bust (when many hares or lynxes die and very few are left) pattern. Look at the pattern in Single-species Population Dynamics In this chapter we move up to the level of the population. The models we consider here attempt to explain and predict patterns of change over time in population density, the number of individuals per unit area or volume. Population dynamics has always been a core topic in theoretical ecology. One of the ... The snowshoe hare is a primary source of food for the Canadian lynx. Explain how the lynx population size changes when the hare population increases. Hare population goes up which means more food for the lynx population. Nov 20, 2014 · This is a graph of the data we collected during the experiment. (red line is the hare population and green is the lynx population) It is plain to see that the population of hares increased rapidly. You can see this same correlation with lynx, even though their population took more generations to reach a large amount. This graph shows the 10-year cyclical fluctuations in the populations (measured by counting the hides offered for sale at the Hudson Bay trading posts in Canada) of the varying hare ("snowshoe rabbit") and its chief predator, the lynx, from 1850 to 1910. The size of the lynx population was closely dependent on the size of its prey (hare ... This group activity will help students understand the population graphs and carrying capacity. It has them simulate the changes that could occur in the boreal forest between the snowshoe hare and the lynx. Students graph the changes in population as well as place the paper hares and lynxes into a Regular Predator Prey Relationship Worksheet Answers P 2. ... population and vice versa the following graph shows how the size of the lynx and snowshoe hare ... Apr 20, 2017 · Students investigate the population dynamics between predator and prey, and the role limiting factors play in the size of a population by graphing and analyzing data of the Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare.<br /> <br /> I use this activity with my sixth gr... 1. The data in the graph above represent the population size of the snowshoe hare—a prey species in northern Canada and Alaska—between 1850 and 1940. If one assumes that the predator and prey have mutual density-dependent effects on one another, the curve drawn for the simultaneous population size of the lynx, a predator on the [T] The populations of the snowshoe hare (in thousands) and the lynx (in hundreds) collected over 7 years from 1937 to 1943 are shown in the following table. The snowshoe hare is the primary prey of the lynx. The snowshoe hare may have up to four litters in a year, which average three to eight young. Males compete for females, and females may breed with several males. A major predator of the snowshoe hare is the Canada lynx. Lynx-Hare Cycles Look at the graph. It illustrates the relationship between the size of the hare population and the size of the lynx population. Notice how each population has a boom (when there are too many lynxes or hares for the available resources) and a bust (when many hares or lynxes die and very few are left) pattern. Look at the pattern in Jun 22, 2011 · The relationship between the Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) and the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) is considered a classic example of how interactions between a predator and its prey can influence population dynamics of the two species. Canada lynx populations rise and fall with fluctuations in populations of snowshoe hares. You can find data related to the Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare pelt-trading records of the Hudson Bay Company, starting in 1845. It seems to be a standard dataset, described for instance in Predator-Prey Models. The base repository is Lynx and Hare Data, and you can find for instance the csv file lynxhare.csv. Lynx and Hare Populations: When the populaion size of the hare increases there is more food for the lynx to eat. As a result the lynx population also increases. The large lynx population will kill more hares so the hare population decreases. This will also cause the hare population to decrease. Students study and analyze data collected on the relationship between the snowshoe hare and lynx in Canada over a 28 year period and create a graph. Students also write a response to a proposal to reduce the lynx population. Lynx-Hare Cycles Look at the graph. It illustrates the relationship between the size of the hare population and the size of the lynx population. Notice how each population has a boom (when there are too many lynxes or hares for the available resources) and a bust (when many hares or lynxes die and very few are left) pattern. Look at the pattern in 12.Do the peaks in the lynx graph line up exactly with the peaks in the hares graph? 13.When the hare population increases, what happens to the lynx population? Why? 14.On your graph, label these periods of prosperity with an arrow and a short description of what is happening in your own words. 15.Look at 1903 and 1904. For each animal make a plot of population totals (the first two columns) versus generation number. By plotting the hare population and the lynx population side by side on the same graph, the relationship between the two should become very clear. Feb 26, 2015 · This paper-and-pencil activity helps students learn about predator-prey population fluctuations. Be sure to subscribe and check out more videos! ... Lynx and the Hare Population Activity ... The Test Case: Canadian Lynx and Snowshoe Hare This research focused on the predation relationship between two specific species in the central regions of Canada: The Canadian Lynx and the Snowshoe Hare. The Canadian Lynx (Lynx canadensis) has been found in regions ranging from Alaska, all through the Nov 20, 2014 · This is a graph of the data we collected during the experiment. (red line is the hare population and green is the lynx population) It is plain to see that the population of hares increased rapidly. You can see this same correlation with lynx, even though their population took more generations to reach a large amount. Aug 31, 2019 · The student simulates the interactions between a predator population of fox and a prey population of rabbits in a meadow. After collecting the data, the student graphs the data and then analyzes the graph to predict the populations for several more generations. Part 3: Exploitation and population cycles. One of the classic studies of predator-prey interactions is the 90-year data set of snowshoe hare and lynx pelts purchased by the Hudson's Bay Company of Canada. While this is an indirect measure of predation, the assumption is that there is a direct relationship between the number of pelts collected ... hare. The snowshoe hare eats plant material. The snowshoe hare population can grow rapidly because. of its high birthrate. The lynx has a much lower birthrate than the hare. 16. From the evidence shown in the graph, what is causing the population of snowshoe hares to change? 17. Name a producer-consumer relationship? 18. Population Dynamics: Predator/Prey Teacher Version In this lab students will simulate the population dynamics in the lives of bunnies and wolves. They will discover how both predator and prey interact with each other and affect the number of individuals in a given region. If there are no predators and the food source is Still, as daunting and wide-ranging as Mills’ project is, some preliminary answers are already beginning to emerge. Unpublished results suggest that the hare population is shifting its cycles from one year to the next to stay in sync with the weather—an environmental response, rather than evolution at work. hare. The snowshoe hare eats plant material. The snowshoe hare population can grow rapidly because. of its high birthrate. The lynx has a much lower birthrate than the hare. 16. From the evidence shown in the graph, what is causing the population of snowshoe hares to change? 17. Name a producer-consumer relationship? 18.